Swansea, Jubilee Chapel, Pell Street

built 1860

Jill Barber

Built in 1860 to replace the first Primitive Methodist Chapel in Tower Lane, which was destroyed in a fire, Jubilee was a grand affair seating 600 people.

An account of its opening appeared in The Cambrian, 5 April 1861. It was built in the classical style, 'with Gibbsian surround' to the central door. The architect was Thomas Thomas (1817-88), who came from Swansea, and was the most important  architect of nonconformist chapels in Wales, producing plans for over 800 chapels.

The minister at the time was Rev George Dobson, and the trustees were John Rees Brenton of Swansea, rate collector, John Excell of Swansea, tea dealer, Samuel Richards of Hafod near Swansea, copperman, Abraham Sutton of Swansea, outfitter, William Henry Standbury of Swansea, plumber, James Frost of Swansea, potter, Thomas Beynon of Swansea, plumber, Thomas Griffiths of Swansea, master mariner, John Taylor of Blackpill in Oystermouth, labourer, and Benjamin Sneyd of Morriston in Llangyfelach, brick manufacturer.

The chapel was destroyed during the bombing of Swansea during the Second World War.  It was situated in Pell Street, facing Horton Street, and the site is now a car park.

Source

S Hughes, 'Thomas Thomas, 1817-88: the first national architect of Wales', reprinted from Archaeologia Cambrensis, 152, 2003.

 

This page was added by Jill Barber on 28/08/2013.
Comments about this page

See the article about the Owen family, who attended Pell Street Primitive Methodist Church.

By Jill Barber
On 05/11/2014

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