Higher Odcombe Primitive Methodist chapel

Photo:1851 Higher Odcombe Primitive Methodist chapel

1851 Higher Odcombe Primitive Methodist chapel

Englesea Brook picture and postcard collection

Photo:1878 Higher Odcombe Primitive Methodist chapel

1878 Higher Odcombe Primitive Methodist chapel

Englesea Brook Museum picture and postcard collection

former Higher Odcombe Primitive Methodist chapel

Chapel Hill, Higher Odcombe, Yeovil BA22 8UH

By Christopher Hill

The  Higher Odcombe Primitive Methodist chapel in the picture on the south side of Chapel Hill was opened in 1858. Google Street View in 2009 shows it in use as a house.

Directly opposite on the north side of Chapel Hill is the 1878 chapel built as a replacement. The original chapel was used as a Sunday School.  

The second chapel closed in 2005 as funding could not be found to address the subsidence at the rear of the building where it adjoins the school building. £100,000 was needed to bring the building up to standard, but the Society could afford the bill.  In 2009 it is shown in use as a house.

There is an account by G Blackwell of the opening of the 1858 chapel in the Primitive Methodist magazine of 1858. There's a story here half told; the society was growing steadily and a second preacher was appointed "but a division ensued, societies were broken up, useful members were lost to the Connexion... ...From that time although at intervals sinners have been converted, the damage done to the station has not been recovered"

Nonetheless there was a revival and the new chapel opened on February 14th 1858. Opening preachers included Rev T Cummin, G Blackwell, L Jesty, S Long and W Clove (Wesleyan).

The chapel measured 26' x 16' and seated just over 100. Donors, collectors and contributors included Mr Sansum, Mrs E and Miss E Brake, Mr and Miss Mathews, L Jesty, Mr Ewens, Mr Bragg, Mrs Seward and Miss Cooper.


Reference

Primitive Methodist magazine April 1858 pp.239-240

 

This page was added by Christopher Hill on 17/01/2016.
Comments about this page

I've added information from the Primitive Methodist magazine about a dispute between preachers that split the society; I wonder what it was about?  There are lessons to be learned here.

By Christopher Hill
On 21/04/2017

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