Stanbridge Primitive Methodist Chapel

Bedfordshire

Stanbridge Primitive Methodist Chapel

Stanbridge is situated 3 miles east of Leighton Buzzard.

The 1851 Ecclesiastical Census includes a return for a Stanbridge PM congregation that states that it was established in 1842. There were 50 Free Sittings, 50 Other and 50 Standing.

Attendances recorded by David Githow, Chapel Steward were:

 

General   Congregation

Sunday   Scholars

Total

Morning

 50

20

70

Afternoon

 80

20

100

Evening

150

150

John Hill, Primitive Methodist Preacher also noted in the return that, ‘Often times the Congregation exceed the Number Stated But we think we may safely say that the number specified is correct.

Registration for worship at Stanbridge PM chapel was made on 9 January 1861 by Matthew Plummer of Luton, bonnet manufacturer (trustee).

The Luton Times and Advertiser, 16 March 1906 stated that ‘during the past few weeks’ Stanbridge PM chapel had been renovated by Messrs W & J Clarke. A re-opening of the chapel had taken place with a public tea and evening public meeting. The profits on the tea, donations and collections amounted to £8.

After Methodist Union as there was also a WM chapel in Stanbridge, the PM chapel closed and was sold. Eventually the land was sold to Bedfordshire County Council and an extension to the neighbouring Primary school was built on the site. The registration for worship was cancelled on 5 August 1954.

Sources and References

The Ecclesiastical Census, Bedfordshire, March 1851 Volume 54 Bedfordshire Historical Record Society – Edited by DW Bushby

Bedfordshire Chapels and Meeting Houses: Official Registration 1672-1901 Volume 75 Bedfordshire Historical Record Society – Edited by Edwin Welch

Luton Times and Advertiser 16 March 1906

Bedfordshire and Luton Archives and Record Service – Community Archives website

Comments about this page

  • Stanbridge Wesleyan Methodist page now set up on My Wesleyan Methodist website.

    By Tim Banks (21/03/2015)
  • Kelly’s Directory 1898 states that the new chapel was built in 1860.

    By Tim Banks (17/03/2015)

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