Lemington Primitive Methodist Church, near Newcastle on Tyne

Tyne & Wear

About 1906
postcard belonging to Revd Steven Wild

Lemington was a small riverside village, about 7 miles from the city centre, when the railway arrived in 1876. The Primitive Methodist Chapel was built in 1891, in Algernon Road, part of the new development which spread up the banks as a result of the new influx brought by the railway.

The back of this postcard is interesting. Dated 9 June 1906, the unknown sender writes, ‘This is the church that I go to. It stands in Algernon Road (Front of it) & Lorraine Terrace. I live about 4 streets behind this church.’ And then the cryptic ”Are you musical”. 

It was addressed to Miss Alice Dunn, 27 Belmont Road, Harrogate, but there is no stamp – was it sent?

Comments about this page

  • Lemington is now within the local government area of Newcastle upon Tyne. This chapel is still active within the Newcastle West Circuit and its congregation has a strong affinity with the poor. Its outer appearance (as per the postcard above) and its superb interior of curved raked pews, pulpit and choir stalls remain unchanged since its opening. At the time of its construction, and in later years, Lemington was a rowdy, radical industrial place as exemplified by the Methodist presence being that of the Primitives and New Connexion only; there was never a Wesleyan presence. It was originally part of a Primitive Circuit that, somewhat unusually, spanned the River Tyne. It is recalled that camp meetings and street evangelism were frequent and that ministers were frowned upon if they wore any type of clerical garb!
    The original Primitive society met in a hut within the Lemington Glass Works. Then in the late 1840s a single room one level chapel was constructed which still remains being opposite the Lemington Community Centre. On its exterior is a small weathered stone plaque stating “Primitive Chapel”. It is now houses the Sea Scouts and nothing of its original chapel interior remains.
    Based on “Lemington Methodist Church Centenary Celebratory Pamphlet. 1992.” Also on recorded memories of the late Michael Thompson (a lifelong member) and local knowledge of this contributor..

    By Nigel McMurray (15/03/2021)

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