Derby Central Primitive Methodist chapel

St. Peter's Churchyard, Derby DE1 1NN

Derby Central Primitive Methodist chapel | Handbook of the 94th Primitive Methodist Conference 1913
Derby Central Primitive Methodist chapel
Handbook of the 94th Primitive Methodist Conference 1913
The former Central Primitive Methodist chapel in Derby | Christopher Hill 2016
The former Central Primitive Methodist chapel in Derby
Christopher Hill 2016
The rear view of the former Central Primitive Methodist chapel, seen from Green Lane | Christopher Hill 2016
The rear view of the former Central Primitive Methodist chapel, seen from Green Lane
Christopher Hill 2016
Derby Central Primitive Methodist chapel | Handbook of the Primitive Methodist Conference 1931; Englesea Brook Museum
Derby Central Primitive Methodist chapel
Handbook of the Primitive Methodist Conference 1931; Englesea Brook Museum

The former Central Primitive Methodist chapel is in the twilight zone on the edge of the central business district of Derby.  In 2016 it is disused and branded as Quicksilver, having been most recently used as an amusement arcade. Google Street view shows it in the same state since August 2008.  In the 1970s it had been converted into a furniture shop and later a bingo hall.

Central  Primitive Methodist chapel  was opened for worship in 1878.  The Primitive Methodist churches at Traffic Street and Kedleston Street were unable to meet the growing needs of central Derby and a Mission was established in the Athenaeum Rooms, Victoria Street for four years. During this time the Mission organised some of the largest Missionary and Sunday School gatherings ever held in the town. The result was the Central Church, opened in 1878 on the corner of St Peter’s Churchyard and Green Street.  In design it was almost identical to the chapel in Kedleston Street.

You can read here an account of the development of Primitive Methodism in Derby from the Handbook of the 94th Primitive Methodist Conference, held in Derby in 1913.

Comments about this page

  • This chapel was in its final years part of the then Derby South circuit, and known as and listed on the plan as Greenhill Central.

    It did not close for worship till some time in the latter part of the twentieth century remaining on the plan till the 1980’s.

    By David Leese (18/01/2017)

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