Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire

The first chapel to sit on Bank Road was founded in 1838

Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire
Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire
Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire
Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire
Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire
Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire
Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel (Bank Road) Derbyshire
A Primitive Methodist Chapel with 'flying buttresses'
A Primitive Methodist Chapel with 'flying buttresses'
Where or what is Isha 30 iv?
Where or what is Isha 30 iv?
1878 Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel as it was in 1998 when it was pending disposal | Keith Guyler 1998
1878 Matlock Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel as it was in 1998 when it was pending disposal
Keith Guyler 1998
Matlock Primitive Methodist chapel from a postcard dated 1901-1909 | Englesea Brook Museum picture and postcard collection
Matlock Primitive Methodist chapel from a postcard dated 1901-1909
Englesea Brook Museum picture and postcard collection

In 1865 the chapel was rebuilt by John Wildgoose.(a well known name in this part of Derbyshire). James Kerridge of Wisbech designed the building. It is quite ornate in that it has flying buttresses.  The opening services were held on 20th February 1866. The Sunday School at the side was built in the same style in 1878.

In 2014 the Sunday School had been converted for residential purposes and the chapel building was up for sale with planning permission for 4 apartments with 2 or 4 bedrooms. The notice board says ‘The Old Methodist Church’.

Photos taken October 2014

OS Map Ref:119:SK302606 

Comments about this page

  • The Primitive Methodist magazine for October 1857 pp.622-623 includes an account by W Watts of the re-opening of Matlock Bank chapel after it had been enlarged to meet the needs of a growing society and Sunday school. The ceremony took place on July 12th 1857 with Mr Shirlock of Derby being the preacher.

    The total cost was about £60 and this was more than met by donations and the income from a tea meeting.  The surplus would be used towards the erection of a porch, gas fittings and palisades at the front of the chapel.   Particular thanks went to “the gentlemen and ladies in Mr Smedley’s Hydropathic Establishment” for the interest they had taken.  I wonder what they actually did!

    By Christopher Hill (16/01/2017)

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