Lockington P M Chapel East Yorkshire

This chapel was built in 1862 supposedly replacing an earlier one of 1825

Photo taken 2009 | Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2009
Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2009 | Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2009
Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2009 | Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2009
Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2013 | Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2013
Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2013 | Elaine and Richard Pearce
Photo taken 2013
Elaine and Richard Pearce
The 1862 Chapel - photo taken 2013 | Elaine and Richard Pearce
The 1862 Chapel - photo taken 2013
Elaine and Richard Pearce

In 1862 a piece of land was acquired from J.Hall Esq. of Scarborough and in that year a chapel was built and opened. It cost £250 and incurred a debt of £50. In 1913 an extension was added which may have become the main worship space.

Sometime in 1977 the chapel roof collapsed after which the chapel was left to rot and decay. This is how it was in 2009 – in a very sorry state (see photos)

In 2012 the chapel building was sold and after numerous planning problems permission was granted to turn it into a three bedroom dwelling. In 2013 work had begun.

Photos taken 2009 and 2013

OS Map ref:106:SE994476

Additional information (CH):

“Lackington, (sic) Driffield Circuit.— Lackington is a pleasant village, situated about midway between Beverley and Driffield. Primitive Methodism was introduced into it many years ago, and with God’s blessing upon the labours of his servants many of the inhabitants were awakened and saved ; a society was raised, but for want of a suitable place of worship the cause was materially retarded ; and numerous unsuccessful efforts were made to obtain a suitable plot of ground on which to erect a chapel.

The recently improved state of the society, congregation, and Sabbath school, demanding a larger and more commodious place of worship, “we determined to make another effort, and application was made to the proprietor of the property in which we worshipped, who agreed to sell us a piece of land, 40 feet long by 18 wide, for the sum of £60. We considered the price very high, especially as the society and congregation belonged to the working classes. But we adopted Nehemiah’s resolution, “The God of heaven, he will prosper us, therefore we his servants will arise and build.”

Having obtained the sanction of the quarterly meeting, &c, the land was purchased, and on Wednesday, August 20th, 1862, the foundation stone was laid by our venerable and long tried friend, Mr. P. Knaggs, of Wetwang ; after which a very appropriate and telling address was delivered by the Rev. W. Mitchell, Independent minister. At 4 o’clock a tea meeting was held, and a public meeting followed. Brother Stather was called to the chair, and the meeting was addressed by Brothers W. Stabler, E. Tyos, T. Giles, W. Coulson, and W. Mitchell. The services were well attended, and told well on the public. The proceeds, amounted to £17 or £18.

This is the fifth new chapel that has been erected in this station within the last few years, besides a new school room ; other chapels have been considerably improved, and the debts lowered, &c. Preparations are now being made to erect a new chapel in another place, and establish a day school ; and as our camp meetings for this season have been attended with unusual unction and power, and many precious souls have been brought to God, we are hoping the revival influence will descend upon every part of the circuit. Thomas Giles.”

Reference

Primitive Methodist magazine  1863 page 111-112

 

 

 

Comments about this page

  • I’ve added the account from the Primitive Methodist Magazine of the laying of the foundation stoke at what it calls Lackington Primitive Methodist chapel. However, the location in the article – halfway between Beverley and Driffield is exactly where Lockington is.

    By Christopher Hill (25/11/2019)
  • Chapel of 1825 rebuilt 1852, architect W. Petch and enlarged 1913.

    By Colin Dews (02/03/2018)

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *