Gardner, Mary (1825-1899)

Transcription of Obituary In the Primitive Methodist Magazine by Samuel Johnson

MARY GARDNER was born at West Bromwich on April 16, 1825. She was from her earliest years the subject of deep religious impressions and convictions, and her heart yearned after good things. In the year 1845, while in her twentieth year, she was led by the Spirit of God to accept Jesus Christ as her Saviour, and to rejoice in the pardoning love of God. This event in her life occurred at West Bromwich. She at once united with our people in that town, when we worshipped in an old place in Walsall Street, some time before any of our chapels were built there. In August of that year she was united in marriage to Samuel Gardner, who now mourns her loss, and he also was a member with our people in Walsall Street, so that they both were about two of the oldest members who were connected with our people in the town of West Bromwich. As a wife she cared for her household, lovingly helped her husband in things temporal and spiritual, and her carefulness and thrift were admired by those who were intimately acquainted with her life. As a mother she endeavoured always, and in every way, to promote the spiritual welfare of her children, and they have risen up to call her blessed. According to her ability she tried to prepare them, to discharge all the duties of life in a true and proper manner, and always set before them the influence of a good example, both in words and in actions.

In 1882, she and her family removed to Liverpool, and settled down with our people at Boundary Street, in the Liverpool Second Circuit, and remained in fellowship there until her death removed her to the higher fellowship of heaven. Though a very great sufferer for many years, she always attended the ordinances of God’s house when able, and to the best of her ability was ready to help on the cause of Christ. Seldom free from bodily pain, yet she bore all with great patience and Christian fortitude. She was a good woman, she knew why she was a Christian, she knew whom she had believed, she had the hope of glory inspiring her life, and that life was exemplary in a high degree.

On the day previous to her death she was surrounded for some time by a darkness which seemed as if it would prevail over her, and leave her end obscured, but suddenly rising above it, as the writer was talking with her about the Saviour’s love and help, she expressed her entire confidence in the Lord Jesus Christ as her Saviour, who had blessed her with many blessings in the past, and who would keep her safe to the end. With a smile lighting up her countenance, which even death could not remove, she exclaimed, “All is well. I am not afraid, I am ready to go home and see Him who has loved me with an everlasting love, and saved me by His grace.” She quietly passed away to her rest on Thursday, March 16, 1899, aged seventy-four years. She was interred in the Anfield Park Cemetery, Liverpool, on Sunday morning, March 19.

A memorial service was held in the Boundary Street Church, on Sunday evening, March 26, when the writer preached to a large congregation. “The memory of the just is blessed.” We pray that the blessing of the Holy One may rest upon the bereaved family.

Family

Mary married Samuel Gardner (b abt1824) in the summer of 1846 at West Bromwich, Staffordshire.

Census returns record the following occupations for Samuel.

  • 1841 boilermaker
  • 1851 gas fitter
  • 1871 fitter
  • 1881 foreman zinc worker
  • 1891 blacksmith

Census returns identify five children.

  • Caroline (b abt1845)
  • Thomas (b abt1847) – a labourer
  • Elizabeth (b1851) – a dressmaker (1881); married William Stent in 1886
  • Clara (abt1856-1947) – married Frank Reece, a glass cutter, in 1875
  • Mary Ann (b1861)

References

Primitive Methodist Magazine 1901/469

Census Returns and Births, Marriages & Deaths Registers

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