Pascoe, Sarah (nee Pope) (1835-1874)

Transcription of obituary published in the Primitive Methodist Magazine by Nicholas Pascoe

Mrs. PASCOE, the beloved wife of the Rev. N. Pascoe, was born at Camerton, near Bath, in the year 1835, and died at Bromyard, Herefordshire, on February 23rd, 1874, in the 39th year of her age~ From a child she was taught to love the Lord. Her mother being a member of the Independents, led her early to the house of God. At the age of 15 years she joined the Primitive Methodist Society. Soon after that a correspondence took place between her and the writer, which lasted until she was nearly 21 years of age, when we were united in marriage, and in that state spent 18 years of uninterrupted happiness; then God took her to himself.

It would require a large book to tell of her worth as a Christian, wife, and mother. She possessed a face that never wore a frown. We have received letters from old colleagues and others; Rev. G. Smith, W. Clulow, T. Dinnick, J. Causland, and others, all paying a very high tribute to her excellent worth.

Her religion was intelligent and biblical, that which made the possessor happy. When returning from our appointments we always found her waiting up, with the Bible as her companion. Her love for God’s house was great. Never absent from the sanctuary, as she enjoyed good health up to within a fortnight of her death. She re-established the Sabbath-school at Bromyard, which was nearly broken up when we entered the station.

As a wife she could not be surpassed. She studied to make her husband comfortable in all things. She would often cheer his mind when cast down. She was a ministering angel in all his trials.

As a mother, she loved her children most affectionately, and did her best to train them in the fear of the Lord. When stationed in Plymouth we lost by death four of our children in about four months, This was a severe shock for her delicate frame, and a trial that she could not easily get over.

Her death was sudden and unexpected. The first week in February she caught a severe cold. Bronchitis, inflammation, and a distressing cough followed. This brought on premature confinement, and these combined brought down the earthly house, and her happy spirit passed into the calm and sunshine of eternal day. She lived fully prepared for death.

Her kind and gentle manner caused her to be greatly beloved in the stations in which we travelled. As a mark of the esteem in which she was held in this station by all parties—members of the Church of England, Wesleyans, and Independents bore the expenses of her funeral, as the last visible token of their great regard for her excellent character and noble worth.

She was interred in the Independent Chapel ground, and her funeral sermon preached in the same chapel by the Rev. J. P. Jones, Independent Minister, to a large and sympathetic congregation. Deeply  lamented by all who knew her.

Faith, hope, and love,
Best boon to mortals given,
Wave their bright wings,
And whisper, she’s in Heaven.

Family

Sarah was born on 3 June 1835 at Camerton, nr Bath, Somerset, to parents William, a grocer (1841), and Sarah. She was baptised on 13 June 1835 at Midsomer Norton Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Somerset

She married Nicholas Pascoe (1830-1905), a PM minister, in the spring of 1856 in the Bristol Registration District, Gloucestershire. Census returns and birth records identify seven children.

  • Sarah Charlotte Clarissa (1857-1869)     
  • Nicholas William Pope (abt1860-1900) – a clerk (1881)      Melksham, wilts
  • Richard Garibaldi Llewellyn (1861-1930) – a letter carrier (1901)   
  • Caroline Alexandria (1863-1903)  – married Joseph James Harwood, a dockyard labourer (1901), in 1891      
  • Dante Brunette (1868-1869)           
  • Frances Gertrude (b1872) – a dressmaker (1891)           
  • Sarah Margaret (1874-1874)    

Sarah died on 23 February 1874 at Bromyard, Herefordshire.

References

Primitive Methodist Magazine 1875/627

Census Returns and Births, Marriages & Deaths Registers

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