West, Hannah, nee Ride (1815-1905)

Transcription of Obituary in the Primitive Methodist Magazine by W. Scruby

By the death of Hannah, the widow of the late Rev. Samuel West, in her ninetieth year, we have lost another link with the beginning of our Connexional history in the South of England.

Mrs.West was the daughter of the Rev. John Ride, the Apostle of Berkshire. She was born on October 14th, 1815; three years later her parents went to America, where after a very brief stay, her mother died of fever. Previous to her death, however, she had entreated her husband to return to England, and give himself up to the work of God. This he did. Soon after his arrival in this country he met Hugh Bourne and William Clowes, and by them was persuaded to become a Primitive Methodist travelling preacher.

Mrs. West had very vivid recollections of the hardships her father endured, and that she shared in those early days; of his imprisonments at Banbury and at Liverpool; also of the kindness of Dr. Adam Clarke who visited him in prison and ministered to his physical needs.

When seventeen years of age Hannah was led to Jesus Christ by Miss Weldon, who afterwards became the first wife of Mr. West, and from that time to her death, lived in conscious communion with Him, and experienced great joy in His service. Ten years after her conversion, Mrs. West having been called to the higher service of heaven, Miss Ride was united in wedlock to the Rev. Samuel West. She at once entered heartily into his labours, sharing his toils and privations, his joys and his sorrows.

In 1867 Mr. West, after a long, arduous, and faithful ministry, was called to his reward. Mrs. West continued to live at Kingswood, Bristol, their last circuit, until 1903, when she removed to Swindon to spend her last days with Mrs. Williamson, her daughter.

When visited she was always bright and quietly confident of her acceptance with God. Her trust was beautiful in its simplicity. Although so far advanced in life her memory was most tenacious; she would recall events of the last eighty years with the greatest accuracy. To the last she retained an intelligent interest in all that was passing, and would converse on social, political, and religious events with great zest. Her Bible and Hymnal were her daily companions, and the daily paper was carefully read. She had her political preferences, and with the condition of the working classes previous to the abolition of the Corn Laws vividly before her mind, she concluded that Mr. Chamberlain was a very bad man. Until within a short time of her death she hoped to get to services again, and desired to attend another old fashioned Camp Meeting.

On the evening of Saturday, August 5th, the aged saint laid her sewing aside to assist in the domestic arrangements for the Sunday.

Her daughter had occasion to leave her for a few minutes while she was taking her supper, but on returning was greatly shocked to find that her mother had been seized with paralysis. She lingered until the following Tuesday, when she entered into rest.

According to her wish her class tickets for more than seventy years, all of which she had carefully preserved, were placed in her coffin with her. She was a sincere Christian, a loyal Church member, a devoted wife, an affectionate mother.

Family

Hannah was born to parents John Ride and Martha Riley.

Hannah married Samuel West (1805-1867) on 18 May 1842 at Reading. Census returns identify eight children.

  • Mary Ann (1842-1912) – married John Williamson, a draper
  • John (1844-1905) – a shoe maker
  • Samuel (b1846)
  • Cornelius (1849-1884) – a commercial clerk
  • Urbane (1852-1933) – a shoe maker
  • Elizabeth (b1855)
  • Jabez (1857-1934) – a boot trade clicker (cuts the uppers for shoes)
  • Emma (1860-1932) – a nurse

References

Primitive Methodist Magazine 1906/579

Census Returns and Births, Marriages & Deaths Registers

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share this
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone