Newman, Joseph (1813-1835)

Died, February 28,1835, at Hannington in Wiltshire, Joseph Newman, in the 22nd year of his age.  In early life he was led into ungodliness, and was a persecutor.  But at a Camp meeting held at Stratton, the Lord arrested him in his wild career.  And afterwards at a Lovefeast held at Hannington, he got savingly converted to God.

Joseph was a man of much prayer; and becoming a servant at a farmer’s house, he frequently, before the hour for bed, would retire into a field, where he has been heard praying and praising God.

Being honest and upright, he was much respected by his master.  Grace had taught him obedience to his master, as a servant of Christ.  He was diligent at the means of grace, and scarcely ever absent from his class.

He was a strong advocate for the cause of religion; and would assist it with pecuniary aid according to his abilities; and was blessed with those graces that adorn the Christian character.

He was seized with a fever which soon put an end to his life and labours, and acts of benevolence.  He was not heard to murmur against the Lord, but previous to his death, having a conflict, he observed, “I have often said I was sure of heaven; but now I do not know where I shall go.”  But after this dark dispensation, he broke into rapturous strains, “Now I can tell where I am going; I am going to Jesus.”  And casting his eves upwards, he said, “How beautiful! — Jesus is waiting.”  And with triumphant shouts of glory, and without a groan, he fell asleep in Jesus.

A great number of members from the adjoining villages, attended his funeral, and walked in procession, two and two, and sung from the house to the church.  The procession had a grand and heavenly appearance.  Oh that we may meet him in heaven!

By the request of the society, I improved his death, from Rev. xiv. 18, to an overflowing congregation.  I preached with good liberty.  Many wept; others rejoiced at such a happy death.

Wm. Wigley

 

Primitive Methodist Magazine, 1838.  Page 277.

 

 

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