Skipton Primitive Methodist Chapel

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Skipton Primitive Methodist Chapel' page

from the collection of Rev Steven Wild

(added by CH 05/17)

There is an account by WL in the 1836 Primitive Methodist magazine of the opening of an earlier Skipton Primitive Methodist chapel than the one in Steve Wild's picture. The opening took place on 26th October 1835 when the preachers were Bros W Clowes, J Hutchinson, J Bywater and W Carthy.

The chapel, which was in the Silsden circuit, measured 33' wide by 56' long and 26' high with galleries at each end and on the front side. There were two cottages built under the end galleries and the cost of land and building was £700.

What happened to these chapels, and where were they?


Reference

Primitive Methodist magazine 1836 p.268

 

This page was added by Jill Barber on 17/11/2014.
Comments about this page

Details of an 1835 chapel have been added.  What happened to both chapels?

By Christopher Hill
On 15/05/2017

The 1836 chapel, built over a stream, is now a retail outlet.  It was replaced 1878-9 by a chapel by the architect Thomas Howdill of Leeds. It was demolished in the 1970s and there are now flats on its site

By Colin Dews
On 02/03/2018

More detail and pictures from Howard Richter - thanks Howard.

This is the 1836 chapel, now 'The Old Fire Station' on Bridge Street:
https://www.google.com/maps/@53.9616816,-2.0196103,3a,75y,215.39h,94.47t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szrEx-J6WUBAESY-6KtK8fg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

and these are the flats  on the site of the later, larger, building, on the south side of Gargrave Road.
https://www.google.com/maps/@53.9621764,-2.0211945,3a,90y,195.41h,97.96t/
data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sLSqw9IGS6FWsH8d2QYDn6Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656


Evidence:

1. The 1836 chapel 'built over a stream' 

A building named 'Providence Chapel ' is shown on the 1856 1:1056 - five feet to the mile - Ordnance Survey map at about SD 9879 5171
https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/398792/451712/13/100454
This is now the 'The Old Fire Station', as shown on the 1989 1:1250
https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/398792/451712/13/101329

I suspect that this is the chapel in question because:
1. It is indeed built over a stream, the Eller Beck
2. If I squint, I think I can make out the text 'Primitive Methodist' on the 1856 map noted above
3. On the next available OS map - the 1891 1:500, this chapel is not named, and the map shows, only a few yards to the north-west , another PM chapel. This immense building, now vanished, is the one in Mr. Wild's picture, and is noted below.

Grade II listed
https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101316946-fire-street-skipton#.W0aCXLhoemU

Flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rossendalewadey/14421279740

First Streetview. looking south-west
https://www.google.com/maps/@53.9616816,-2.0196103,3a,75y,215.39h,94.47t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szrEx-J6WUBAESY-6KtK8fg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Second Streetview, looking south-of-east
https://www.google.com/maps/@53.9615717,-2.0200646,3a,90y,122.38h,104.23t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sxf_m7vMUXs08EI3E1N9HWw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

You note that
The chapel, which was in the Silsden circuit, measured 33' wide by 56' long and 26' high with galleries at each end and on the front side. There were two cottages built under the end galleries 

The first Streetview shows one cottage to the left-and-below of the large 'CAFE' sign.

The second Streetview shows what I think must be the blocked front-door of the other cottage behind the left-hand green lid. (Note, incidentally, the 'Weak Bridge' sign to the left of the bin).


2. The later, larger, chapel, the one in your picture:

This is now flats - on south side of Gargrave Road at SD 9870 5178
The chapel is shown on the 1891 1:500 OS map
https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/398709/451775/13/100455
and on the 1969-1970 1:2500
https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/398700/451780/12/100955
but not on the 1979-1986 edition
https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/398700/451780/12/100956

An aerial view of chapel
https://britainfromabove.org.uk/en/image/EPW024523
The chapel is towards the top of the picture on the vertical centre-line - it is seen nearly end-on; nearest the camera is its very tall brightly-lit gable-end, to the left of an open space.

By Howard Richter
On 14/07/2018