Winterley Primitive Methodist Chapel Cheshire

Photo:Photo No. 1.

Photo No. 1.

This photo is by kind permission of the Society at Winterley Methodist Chapel and Cheshire South Circuit

Photo:Photo No. 2.

Photo No. 2.

Photo:Photo No. 3.

Photo No. 3.

Photo:Photo No. 4.

Photo No. 4.

Photo:Photo No.5. Interior view of Winterley Chapel in the early 1900s

Photo No.5. Interior view of Winterley Chapel in the early 1900s

This photo is by kind permission of the Society at Winterley Methodist Chapel

Photo:Photo No. 6

Photo No. 6

Photo:Photo No. 7. Sunday School photo taken in the late 1950s

Photo No. 7. Sunday School photo taken in the late 1950s

This photo is by kind permission of the Society at Winterley Methodist Chapel

Photo:Photo No. 8

Photo No. 8

Photo:Photo No. 9

Photo No. 9

Photo:Photo No. 10

Photo No. 10

Photo:Photo No. 11. A brick sponsored by F. Evans during building in 1873

Photo No. 11. A brick sponsored by F. Evans during building in 1873

The original chapel was built in 1834

Winterley appears on a circuit plan as early as 1820.

This small brick built chapel erected in 1834 was enlarged in 1873. A Sunday School was added in 1903 and this building sits at the side of the main chapel.

In 2016 the chapel is still open for worship. The community use the building as does the Winterley Brass Band. The band was founded in 1938 and has been involved with the chapel ever since. In 2016 it is one of only five Methodist Brass Bands in the country and they play an important part in the life of the present day church.

Photos 2-4 taken January 2014

Photos 6, 8-11 taken May 2016

OS Map Ref:118:SJ747574

Primitive Methodist Magazine (1835), has an account by T Morgan of the opening of 'Wintaley' Primitive Methodist chapel.  

'On Sunday, June 22, 1834, was opened for divine worship, our new chapel at Wintaley, in Cheshire Brother James Bourne preached at ten in the morning, with great Unction. Brother Thomas Bateman at two o’ clock; and Sister E. Allen at six in the evening, and at seven o’ clock on the Monday evening.

The congregations were large and the collections amounted to upwards of fifteen pounds. This chapel is twenty-six feet long, by twenty-two feet wide. It has twelve elevated pews; is beautifully situated and well attended. And it is finished in a manner that does credit to the builders. And on the whole it is as credible  little chapel as most in the country.'


 

This page was added by Elaine and Richard Pearce on 03/07/2016.